Blog

Explore content produced by Simmons University's online graduate programs.


Why Become a Family Nurse Practitioner

A family nurse practitioner’s job is multi-faceted with responsibilities that include diagnosing illnesses, helping patients manage chronic conditions, and prescribing medications. Salaries vary by state and the type of practice where an FNP works.

BehaviorAnalysis@Simmons Faculty Spotlight: Kylan Turner, PhD, BCBA-D, LBA

Associate professor Kylan Turner’s research in interventions to address sleep and feeding behavior problems in children with autism has taken her around the world.

Exploring Post Graduate Licensure: LCSW vs. LMSW

A Master of Social Work (MSW) is the gateway to most professional opportunities in the field, but new MSW graduates face some choices. Most MSW graduates complete coursework in a wide range of subjects, including clinical practice, social policy, human behavior, research, advocacy, and specific populations such as children or older adults.

 

Master of Social Work Versus Master of Psychology

So you have already earned your bachelor’s degree and have decided to pursue the next stage of academia — the master’s degree. You’re interested in direct practice and helping individuals, families, groups, and communities to improve their well-being and achieve success in areas of their lives where they may be struggling. You may be torn between getting a master’s degree in psychology or in social work, and are wondering what each degree can do for you.

Differences Between Clinical and Non-Clinical Social Work

The need for professional social workers continues to grow. It’s important to understand the different types of social work — clinical or non-clinical — so that you can make an informed decision about which area of practice is the best fit for you. While both types of social workers are educated at the graduate level, there are key differences.

The Frontlines of Intimate Partner Violence

Most cases of intimate partner violence go unreported for a variety of reasons — including fear, threats, coercion, or a lack of resources to survive without the support of an abuser. Partners may also love or hold a deep attachment to their abuser and make excuses for his or her behavior. Clinicians who identify intimate partner violence early can help prevent lasting emotional or physical injury and save lives.